Exercising your Options with RLS

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exercise RLS

It’s important for everyone to exercise as regularly and as often as possible. However, if you have RLS you’ll need to use sound judgment and follow the advice of your health care practitioner before embarking on an exercise program.

Stretching
Regardless of the exercise program you choose, it’s helpful to stretch and warm up before you get started. Following are a couple of suggested stretches for RLS patient:

Calf stretch
With your palms flat against the wall, stretch out your arms. Your elbows should nearly be straight. Now bend your right knee slightly and place your left leg back a couple of feet. Your heel and foot should be flat on the floor. Bold this position for about 30 seconds. Next, bend your left knee and keep the heel and foot flat on the floor. Repeat the exercise a couple of times.

Front thigh stretch
Stand parallel to the wall to balance yourself. Grab onto one of your ankles, then pull it toward your buttocks while keeping the other leg straight. Hold for about 45 seconds. Switch your legs and repeat.

Simple Hip Flexor stretch
Tight flexor muscles can result in low back and hip pain; if you sit at a desk most of the day these muscles tend to tighten. The seated butterfly flex is a great way to loosen up your flexor muscles. With your back straight and shoulders down, sit on the floor. Next put the soles of your feet together (in front of you). Your knees should be bent to the side. Tighten your abs muscles for the best results. Keeping those positions, stretch your legs but not forcefully enough to cause discomfort.

Warming up
Walk around or do stationery calisthenics (if you can, and not rigorously) for about 5 minutes, just to get your heart rate up. Do not overdo it; remember strenuous exercise, especially before bedtime can aggravate your RLS symptoms.

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Rested Legs™ is a revolutionary natural remedy that is designed to help people suffering from Restless Leg Syndrome.

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